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Transformation and Mineralization of Aroclor 1254

  • H.-P. E. Kohler
  • D. Kohler-Staub
  • D. D. Focht
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 45)

Abstract

Aroclor 1254 was transformed by actively growing cells of Acinetobacter P6 to a greater extent than by resting cell suspensions. This was commensurate with the exponential loss of biphenyl-oxidizing activity with whole cells to 5% of the original after 28 hours. Acinetobacter P6 growing on biphenyl was able to transform 34% of Aroclor 1254 (10 ppm). P6 was also grown in co-culture together with three strains that show prospects of transforming metabolites produced by Acinetobacter P6 during co-metabolism of Aroclor. P6, strains HBP1, TCC1, and 4ClBz1 were grown on different combinations of the following substrates: biphenyl, 2,2′-dihydroxybiphenyl, trans-3-chlorocrotonic acid, 4-chlorobenzoic acid, and 10 ppm of Aroclor 1254 spiked with 14C-Aroclor 1254. In the case of Acinetobacter P6 growing solely on biphenyl, 0.6% of the original radioactivity could be found as 14C-CO2. Although up to 45% of the radioactive Aroclor 1254 was transformed in co-cultures of Acinetobacter P6 together with the three additional strains, no more than 2.6% could be recovered as 14C-CO2. Degradation of metabolites formed by Acinetobacter P6, rather than the initial oxidation of Aroclor 1254, might be the rate-limiting step in the overall mineralization of these polychlorinated biphenyls.

Keywords

Microbial Degradation Unsaturated Fatty Acid Aromatic Compound Initial Oxidation Additional Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.-P. E. Kohler
    • 1
  • D. Kohler-Staub
    • 1
  • D. D. Focht
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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