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Seeking Convergence in Race Relations Research

Japanese-Americans and the Resurrection of the Internment
  • Don T. Nakanishi
Part of the Perspectives in Social Psychology book series (PSPS)

Abstract

Research on American race relations is at a critical divide. After a decade or more of collectively debunking demeaning myths and stereotypes about minority life, as well as challenging an array of earlier, order-based theories such as assimilation, the field has come to reflect a rich mosaic of new paradigmatic tendencies and goals. Race, which has always been a fuzzy concept, can no longer be analyzed on its own slippery terms. Instead, it now must be conjugated with often equally muddy notions of class and gender. Psychology and sociology, which previously could claim almost exclusive title to the domain of intergroup relations research, have had to give substantive ground to other methodological and analytical approaches. Recent contributions from disciplines as old as economics, history, literature, and political science, or seemingly new like ethnic studies or policy studies, have clearly led to a more provocatively pluralistic field of inquiry. And finally, among other major changes, research on American race relations has begun to reflect, slowly but nonetheless to a greater extent than it did before, the multiracial reality of America’s past, present, and future. New research on Chicanos, American Indians, and Asian Pacific Americans have not supplanted, nor have they sought to supplant, the long tradition of scholarship on blacks. But they have provided added credence to viewing persistent societal conditions of poverty, discrimination, prejudice, and powerlessness from multiple vantage points of group experiences. These contributions on other nonwhite populations have augmented the research agenda on American race relations by demonstrating the continued importance of issues dealing with language, immigration, and land ownership. They have also underscored the need for new visions, interpretations, and conceptualizations of America’s multiracial experience.

Keywords

Racial Minority Concentration Camp Race Relation Model Minority Pearl Harbor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don T. Nakanishi
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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