Symbolic Racism

  • David O. Sears
Part of the Perspectives in Social Psychology book series (PSPS)

Abstract

Throughout our history, white Americans have singled out Afro-Americans for particularly racist treatment. Of all the many immigrant nationalities that have come to these shores since the seventeenth century, Afro-Americans have consistently attracted the greatest prejudice based on their group membership and have been treated in the most categorically unequal fashion.

Keywords

Affirmative Action Party Identification Racial Attitude Racial Equality National Election Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • David O. Sears
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Letters and SciencesUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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