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Desegregation, Jigsaw, and the Mexican-American Experience

  • Elliot Aronson
  • Alex Gonzalez
Part of the Perspectives in Social Psychology book series (PSPS)

Abstract

In 1954, when the U.S. Supreme Court outlawed school segregation, hopes ran high that we might be on our way to a better society. At that time, many of us believed that, if only youngsters from various ethnic and racial backgrounds could share the same classroom, negative stereotypes would fade and cross-ethnic friendships would develop under the glow of contact. Ultimately, it was believed, these young people would grow into adults who would be largely free of the racial and ethnic prejudice that had plagued our society since its inception.

Keywords

Black Child Minority Child School Desegregation Ethnic Prejudice Brown Decision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elliot Aronson
    • 1
  • Alex Gonzalez
    • 2
  1. 1.Adlai E. Stevenson CollegeUniversity of CaliforniaSanta CruzUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State UniversityFresnoUSA

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