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The Contribution of School Desegregation to Academic Achievement and Racial Integration

  • Willis D. Hawley
  • Mark A. Smylie
Part of the Perspectives in Social Psychology book series (PSPS)

Abstract

It seems reasonable to assert that, in the last 30 years, no social policy has been as divisive as school desegregation. And few would argue that the numbers of minority and white leaders actively pursuing the goal of desegregation has declined from a decade or more ago. But the issue will not go away, and advocacy persists for at least two general reasons. First, on balance, and even though both massive and passive resistance have been more common than genuine efforts to make it work, school desegregation has benefited most of those who have experienced it. Second, the problems that school desegregation was meant to address are still with us in many communities, and social policies likely to be more effective in remediating them are not in evidence.

Keywords

Academic Achievement Minority Student American Educational Research Association Desegregation Plan American Educational Research Journal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Willis D. Hawley
    • 1
  • Mark A. Smylie
    • 2
  1. 1.Office of the Dean of Education, Peabody CollegeVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.School of EducationUniversity of IllinoisChicagoUSA

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