Racism and Sexism

Comparisons and Conflicts
  • Pamela Trotman Reid
Part of the Perspectives in Social Psychology book series (PSPS)

Abstract

Are racism and sexism parallel or separate processes? Can we apply findings from one area of research to the other? Obviously, any response to such questions must be conditional, subject to definitions of the terms themselves as well as to the specific circumstances under which the questions are answered. These questions are necessarily asked, however, in light of this society’s long-standing interest in racial prejudice and its increased awareness of discrimination based on gender. For this reason, there is a need to understand the extent to which the biased treatment of women may be legitimately compared to that of blacks. In other words, can it be determined whether racism and sexism are parts of a generalized response set, or if they are two different behaviors? In this chapter, the analysis has two components. In the first part, an examination of racism and sexism is presented with respect to a variety of dimensions relative to the assessment of the existence of parallelism: the definitions, the causes, and the scope of the problems. This review emphasizes social-psychological perspectives, although it is recognized that many other disciplines, such as economics, history, and political science, have contributed to the literature on racism and sexism. The second part of the chapter deals with the impact of both processes on black women, who have dual identities and are oppressed under each. In addition, the possibility that these processes may have an additive effect is explored. Specifically, in the second part of the chapter, the conflicts arising from the racism and sexism that are presented to black women are examined. It is suggested that black women may need special consideration because of their unique position relative to the movements both for women’s equity and for black civil rights.

Keywords

White Woman Black Woman Black Community Black Family Racial Attitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pamela Trotman Reid
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Tennessee at ChattanoogaChattanoogaUSA

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