Advertisement

Molecular Orbital Studies on the Primary Donor P960 in Reaction Centers of Rps. viridis

  • M. Plato
  • F. Lendzian
  • W. Lubitz
  • E. Tränkle
  • K. Möbius
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 149)

Abstract

One outstanding question in bacterial photosynthesis research concerns the relevance of the dimeric nature of the primary donor P for the fast electron transfer step from the first excited singlet state 1P*H to the charge separated state P+H, where H stands for the intermediate acceptor bacteriopheophytin. This problem can only be attacked by performing a detailed study of the electronic structure of the primary donor itself and of the electronic interactions between all involved cofactors in their various active states. This requires the combined effort of high resolution X-ray crystallography, powerful spectroscopic methods and sufficiently advanced quantum-chemical calculations.

Keywords

Spin Density High Occupied Molecular Orbital Lower Unoccupied Molecular Orbital Primary Donor Spin Density Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J. Deisenhofer, O. Epp, K, Miki, R. Huber, and H. Michel, J.Mol. Biol., 180:385 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. J. Deisenhofer, O. Epp, K, Miki, R. Huber, and H. Michel, Nature 318:618 (1985).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. H. Michel, O. Epp, and J. Deisenhofer, EMBO J. 5: 2445 (1986).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 2.
    M. S. Davis, A. Forman, L.K. Hansen, J.P. Thornber, and J. Fajer, J. Phys. Chem., 83:3325 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 3.
    W. Lubitz, F. Lendzian, M. Plato, K. Möbius, and E. Tränkle, in: “Antennas and reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria — structure, interactions and dynamics,” M. E. Michel-Beyerle, ed., Springer, Berlin (1985).Google Scholar
  6. 4.
    F. Lendzian, W. Lubitz, K. Möbius, M. Plato, E. Tränkle, A.J. Hoff, and H. Scheer, Chem.Phys.Lett., to be published.Google Scholar
  7. 5.
    W. Lubitz, F. Lendzian, M. Plato, E. Tränkle, and K. Möbius, Proc.Coll. Ampere XXIII (Rome) 486 (1986).Google Scholar
  8. 6.
    J. R. Norris, R. A. Uphaus, H. L. Crespi and J. J. Katz, Proc.Natl. Acad.Sci. USA, 68:625 (1971).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 7.
    W. Lubitz, F. Lendzian, H. Scheer, J. Gottstein, M. Plato, and K. Möbius, Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci. USA, 81:1401 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 8.
    W. Lubitz, R. A. Isaacson, E. C. Abresch and G. Feher, Proc.Natl. Acad.Sci. USA, 81:7792 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 9.
    F. Lendzian, W. Lubitz, H. Scheer, C. Bubenzer, and K. Möbius, J.Am.Chem.Soc. 103: 4635 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 10.
    W. Lubitz, F. Lendzian, H. Scheer, M. Plato, and K. Möbius, in: “Photochemistry and photobiology, Proceedings of the International Conference, University of Alexandria, Egypt, A.H. Zewail, ed., Harwood, New York (1983), p. 1057.Google Scholar
  13. 11.
    M. Plato, E. Tränkle, W. Lubitz, F. Lendzian, and K. Möbius, Chem. Phys. 107: 185 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 12.
    J. A. Pople and D. L. Beveridge, “Approximate molecular orbital theory,” McGraw-Hill, New York (1970).Google Scholar
  15. 13.
    J. Ridley and M. Zerner, Theoret.Chim. Acta (Berl.) 32:111 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 14.
    M. J. S. Dewar, J. A. Hashmall, and C. G. Venier, J.Am.Chem.Soc. 90: 1953 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 15.
    M. Plato, F. Lendzian W. Lubitz, E. Tränkle, and K. Möbius, to be published.Google Scholar
  18. 16.
    F. Lendzian, W. Lubitz, R. Steiner, E. Tränkle, M. Plato, H. Scheer, and K. Möbius, Chem.Phys.Lett., 126:290 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 17.
    G. Nemethy, M. S. Pottle, and H. A. Scheraga, J.Phys.Chem., 83:1883 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 18.
    M. Plato and C.J. Winscom, in these Proceedings.Google Scholar
  21. 19.
    M. E. Michel-Beyerle, M. Plato, J. Deisenhofer, H. Michel, M. Bixon, and J. Jortner, Biochim.Biophys. Acta, in press.Google Scholar
  22. 20.
    J. Jortner and M. E. Michel-Beyerle in: “Antennas and reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria — structure, interactions and dynamics,” M. E. Michel-Beyerle, ed., Springer, Berlin (1985).Google Scholar
  23. 21.
    J. Breton, J.-L. Martin, A. Migus, A. Antonetti, and A. Orszag, Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci. USA, 83:5121 (1986).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Plato
    • 1
  • F. Lendzian
    • 1
  • W. Lubitz
    • 2
  • E. Tränkle
    • 3
  • K. Möbius
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für MolekülphysikFreie Universität BerlinBerlin 33Germany
  2. 2.Institut für Organische ChemieFreie Universität BerlinBerlin 33Germany
  3. 3.Institut für Theorie der ElementarteilchenFreie Universität BerlinBerlin 33Germany

Personalised recommendations