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Effects of Nerve Injury and Colchicine Treatment on the Recovery of Non-Specific Cholinesterase Activity in Specialized Schwann Cells of Rat Simple Lamellar Corpuscles

  • Petr Dubový
  • Jan Hájek
  • Ivana Svíženská
  • Lubomír Malinovský
  • Hana Procházková

Abstract

The high level of non-specific cholinesterase (nCHE) activity is a remarkable feature of sensory corpuscles. In the light microscope, the nCHE staining persists in sensory corpuscles for a long time after nerve lesion. However, the electron microscopical findings suggest that the interaction with intact axon terminals is indispensable for the synthesis of nCHE in the sensory corpuscles (Idé, 1982a, b).

Keywords

Schwann Cell Inner Core Nerve Lesion Colchicine Treatment Dermal Papilla 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Petr Dubový
    • 1
  • Jan Hájek
    • 1
  • Ivana Svíženská
    • 1
  • Lubomír Malinovský
    • 1
  • Hana Procházková
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy, Medical FacultyPurkyně UniversityBrnoCzechoslovakia

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