The Effect of Opioid Peptides on the Functional Recovery of Damaged Neuronal Structures

  • G. N. Akoev
  • O. B. Ilyinsky
  • L. I. Kolosova
  • M. I. Titov
  • O. G. Trofimova

Abstract

The discovery of endogenous opioid peptides (OP) — endorphins and enkephalins (Hughes, 1975; Hughes et al., 1975, Kosterlitz and Hugnes, 1975) which play a conspicuous role in the nervous system function is one of the most important achievements of modern neurobiology (Krieger, 1983; Akil et al., 1984; Olson et al., 1984). The abundance of OP in nervous tissue, and the multiplicity of their functions (Atwen, 1983; North and Williams, 1983; Wood, 1983; Woolverton and Schuster, 1983) as well as the regulatory influence of endorphines on RNA synthesis (Lindvall and Bjorklund, 1974) have considerably stimulated our interest in the study of effects of OP on nervous tissue growth. Recently (Ilyinsky et al., 1985a; 1985b; 1986a) it has been shown that OP stimulate nervous tissue growth in culture. This effect is twofold: in neurons the peptides stimulate the outgrowth of neurites and their survival, while in glial cells they change the rate of their migration and, probably, their proliferation. It has been also shown that OP stimulate the processes of regeneration and growth of the sympathetic nervous tissue in vivo (Ilyinsky et al., 1986b). It was assumed that endogenous OP, released in the nervous system as a result of activation of the antinociceptive structures are playing an important role in the repair of damaged neural structures (Ilyinsky and Titov, 1985; Ilyinsky et al., 1986c). Proceeding from these facts the investigation of the OP effect on the regeneration processes of peripheral parts of the somatic nervous system as well as on the recovery of function of some mechanoreceptors was undertaken.

Keywords

Sciatic Nerve Receptive Field Mechanical Stimulation Opioid Peptide Impulse Activity 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. N. Akoev
    • 1
  • O. B. Ilyinsky
    • 1
  • L. I. Kolosova
    • 1
  • M. I. Titov
    • 1
  • O. G. Trofimova
    • 1
  1. 1.USSR Cardiology Research CenterAcademy of Medical SciencesMoscowUSSR

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