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Medical, Legal, and Ethical Conundrums at the Edge of Life

  • George P. SmithII

Abstract

Each year, approximately 30,000 genetically handicapped at-risk infants are born in the United States.1 In Australia alone, it has been estimated by the new South Wales Health Commission that approximately $500,000 will be spent during an average lifetime for one institutionalized person with a genetic abnormality.2

Keywords

Leading Ethicist Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Handicapped Individual United States Supreme Vocational Rehabilitation Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • George P. SmithII
    • 1
  1. 1.The Catholic University of America School of LawUSA

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