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The Continuum of Autistic Characteristics

  • Lorna Wing
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

As a result of the accumulation of findings from biologic, psychological, and clinical research, views of the etiology and nature of childhood autism have evolved and changed since Kanner (1943) published his first description of the syndrome that bears his name. However, disagreements continue concerning the clinical criteria for diagnosis, and the boundaries between autism and other conditions in which there are impairments of skills and abnormalities of behavior.

Keywords

Developmental Disorder Autistic Child Pervasive Developmental Disorder Social Impairment Psychological Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorna Wing
    • 1
  1. 1.MRC Social Psychiatry Unit, Institute of PsychiatryUniversity of LondonLondonEngland

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