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Classification and Diagnosis of Childhood Autism

  • Fred R. Volkmar
  • Donald J. Cohen
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Kanner’s (1943) description of the autistic syndrome stands as a classic example of the contribution of an individual clinician investigator to psychiatric taxonomy. Despite subsequent modifications, this description has proven remarkably enduring; it stands as a benchmark against which all subsequent attempts to refine the diagnostic concept must be measured. Kanner’s description also suggested false leads for research (e.g., parental psychopathology) and colors current conceptions of this disorder almost irrevocably. How might we view these disorders today if Kanner had never published his initial case reports?

Keywords

Autistic Child Child Psychiatry Pervasive Developmental Disorder Autistic Individual Infantile Autism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred R. Volkmar
    • 1
  • Donald J. Cohen
    • 1
  1. 1.Child Study CenterYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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