Diagnosis and Assessment of Preschool Children

  • Linda R. Watson
  • Lee M. Marcus
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Our purpose in this chapter is to provide a clinically useful discussion of the diagnosis and assessment of preschool children with autism and related disorders. The syndrome of autism is by definition a disorder which is first manifested during the preschool years, usually prior to thirty months of age (American Psychiatric Association, 1980; National Society for Autistic Children, 1978; Rutter, 1978). Thus, child development professionals in various fields need to recognize the symptoms of the condition in preschool-age children, and be prepared to assess the skills and needs of these children and their families.

Keywords

Preschool Child Autistic Child Child Psychiatry Pervasive Developmental Disorder Vineland Adaptive Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda R. Watson
    • 1
  • Lee M. Marcus
    • 1
  1. 1.Division TEACCHThe University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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