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Assessment in the Classroom

  • Gary B. Mesibov
  • Marian Troxler
  • Susan Boswell
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

The assessment of a handicapped child usually consists of a careful examination of individual strengths and weaknesses, with the goal of understanding that particular youngster and developing the most appropriate individualized educational program for him/her. There are many ways of accomplishing this, and a wide variety of assessment instruments have been developed to facilitate the process. Recently, some theorists have begun to question the value of this process and to ask whether assessment is a necessary or even desirable adjuct to providing educational and treatment services to handicapped children and their families.

Keywords

Task Analysis Autistic Child Careful Assessment Play Skill Individual Strength 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary B. Mesibov
    • 1
  • Marian Troxler
    • 2
  • Susan Boswell
    • 2
  1. 1.Division TEACCHUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Millbrook Elementary SchoolRaleighUSA

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