Family Assessment in Autism

  • Sandra Harris
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Living in a family is not easy. Living in a family with a handicapped child, especially a child with a disability as serious as autism, is even tougher. It is not surprising that the stress of raising an autistic child manifests itself in the relationships among family members (Harris & Powers, 1984). Sometimes, however, we may be at risk of assuming that problems that arise in a family with a handicapped child are primarily a product of the child’s special needs; we fail to appreciate the extent to which other factors may influence on the family as well.

Keywords

Family Therapy Extended Family Autistic Child Marital Satisfaction Parent Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abidin, R. R. (1983). Parenting stress index—Manual (PSI). Charlottesville, VA: Pediatric Psychology Press.Google Scholar
  2. Ackerman, N. J. (1980). The family with adolescents. In E. A. Carter & M. McGoldrick (Eds.), The family life cycle: A framework for family therapy (pp. 147–69). New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  3. Alexander, J. F., Barton, C., Schiavo, R. S., & Parsons, B. V. (1976). Systems-behavioral intervention with families of delinquents: Therapist characteristics, family behavior, and outcome. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 44, 656–64.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Baucom, D. H. (1982). A comparison of behavioral contracting and problem-solving/communications training in behavioral marital therapy. Behavior Therapy, 13, 162–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Boss, P. G. (1983). The marital relationship: Boundries and ambiguities. In H. I. McCubbin & C. R. Figley (Eds.), Stress and the family. Vol. I: Coping with normative transitions (pp. 26–40). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  6. Bowen, M. (1978). Family therapy in clinical practice. New York: Jason Aronson.Google Scholar
  7. Boyle, T. D., & Harris, S. L. (1986). The relationship between marital satisfaction and the distribution of parent involvement with developmentally disabled children. Manuscript submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  8. Brandt, J. O. (1980). The family with young children. In E. A. Carter & M. McGoldrick (Eds.), The family life cycle: A framework for family therapy (pp. 121–146). New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  9. Bristol, M. M. (1984). Family resources and successful adaptation to autistic children. In E. Schopler & G. B. Mesibov (Eds.), Issues in Autism. Vol. III. The effects of autism on the family (pp. 289–310). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Burton, L. M., & Bengtson, V. L. (1985). Black grandmothers. Issues of timing and continuity of roles. In V. L. Bentson & J. F. Robertson (Eds.), Grandparenthood (pp. 61–77). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  11. Carter, E. A., & McGoldrick, M. (Eds.). (1980a). The family life cycle. A framework for family therapy. New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  12. Carter, E. A., & McGoldrick, M. (1980b). The family life cycle and family therapy: An overview. In E. A. Carter & M. McGoldrick (Eds.), The family life cycle: A framework for family therapy (pp. 3–20). New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  13. Chavkin, D. (1986). Stress in mothers of eight to twelve year old autistic and spina bifida children. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Rutgers State University, Piscataway, NJ.Google Scholar
  14. Crosby, J. F., & Jose, N. L. (1983). Death: Family adjustment to loss. In C. R. Figley & H. I. McCubbin (Eds.), Stress and the family. Vol II. Coping with catastrophe (pp. 76–89). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  15. Figley, C. R., & McCubbin, H. I. (Eds.). (1983). Stress and the family. Vol. II. Coping with catastrophe. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  16. Gath, A. (1978). Down’s syndrome and the family—The early years. London: Academic.Google Scholar
  17. Harris, S. L. (1983). Families of the developmentally disabled: A guide to behavioral intervention. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  18. Harris, S. L. (1984). The family and the autistic child: A behavioral perspective. Family Relations, 33, 127–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Harris, S. L., Handleman, J. S. & Palmer. C. (1985). Parents and grandparents view the autistic child. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorder, 15, 127–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Harris, S. L., & Powers, M. (1984). Behavior therapists look at the impact of the family system. In E. Schopler & G. B. Mesibov (Eds.), Issues in autism, Vol. III: The effects of autism on the family (pp. 207–24). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Herz, F. (1980). The impact of death and serious illness on the family life cycle. In E. A. Carter & M. McGoldrick (Eds.), The family life cycle: A framework for family therapy (pp. 223–40). New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  22. Holroyd, J. (1974). The questionnaire on resources and stress: An instrument to measure family response to a handicapped member. Journal of Community Psychology, 2, 92–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Holroyd, J., Brown, N., Wikler, L., & Simmons, J. (1975). Stress in the families of institutionalized and non-institutionalized autistic children. Journal of Community Psychology, 3, 26–31.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Holroyd, J., & McArthur, D. (1976). Mental retardation and stress on the parents: A contrast between Down’s syndrome and childhood autism. American Journal of Mental Deficiency, 80, 431–6.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Jacobson, N. S. (1977). Problem solving and contingency contracting in the treatment of marital discord. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 45, 92–100.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Jacobson, N. S. (1978). Specific and nonspecific factors in the effectiveness of a behavioral approach to the treatment of marital discord. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 46, 442–52.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Jacobson, N. S. (1979). Increasing positive behavior in severely distressed marital relationships: The effects of problem solving training. Behavior Therapy, 10, 311–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Kidwell, J., Fisher, J. L., Dunham, R. M., & Baranowski, M. (1983). Parents and adolescents: Push and pull of change. In H. I. McCubbin & C. R. Figley (Eds.), Stress and the family. Vol. I: Coping with normative transitions (pp. 74–89). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  29. Koegel, R. L., Glahn, T. J., & Nieminen, G. S. (1978). Generalization of parent-training results. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 11, 95–109.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Koegel, R. L., Schreibman, L., Britten, K. R., Burke, J. C., & O’Neill, R. E. (1982). A comparison of parent training to direct child treatment. In R. L. Koegel, A. Rincover, & A. L. Egel (Eds.), Educating and understanding autistic children (pp. 260–79). San Diego, CA: College Hill.Google Scholar
  31. Koegel, R. L., Schreibman, L., O’Neill, R. E., & Burke, J. C. (1983). The personality and familyinteraction characteristics of parents of autistic children. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 51, 683–92.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Koegel, R. L., Schreibman, L., Johnson, J., O’Neill, R. E., & Dunlap, G. (1984). Collateral effects of parent training on families with autistic children. In R. F. Dangel & R. A. Polster (Eds.), Parent training: Foundations of research and practice (pp. 358–78). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  33. Mash, E. J., Terdal, L., & Anderson, K. (1973). The response-class matrix: A procedure for recording parent-child interactions. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 40, 163–4.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. McGoldrick, M. (1980). The joining of families through marriage: The new couple. In E. A. Carter & M. McGoldrick (Eds.), The family life cycle: A framework for family therapy (pp. 93–119). New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  35. McCubbin, H. I., & Figley, C. R. (Eds.). (1983). Stress and the family. Vol. I: Coping with normative transitions. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  36. McCubbin, J. I., & Patterson, J. M. (1983). Family transitions: Adaptation to stress. In H. I. McCubbin & C. R. Figley (Eds.), Stress and the family. Vol. I: Coping with normative transitions (pp. 5–25). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  37. McCullough, P. (1980). Launching children and moving on. In E. A. Carter & M. Goldrick (Eds.), The family life cycle: A framework f or family therapy (pp. 171–95). New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  38. Minuchin, S. (1974). Families and family therapy. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  39. Moos, R. H. (1975). Evaluating correctional and community settings. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  40. Newsom, C., & Rincover, A. (1981). Autism. In E. J. Mash & L. G. Terdal (Eds.), Behavioral assessment of childhood disorders (pp. 397–439). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  41. Patterson, J. M., & McCubbin, H. I. (1983). The impact of family life events and changes on the health of a chronically ill child. Family Relations, 32, 255–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Robin, A. L. (1981). Controlled evaluation of problem-solving communication training with parentadolescent conflict. Behavior Therapy, 12, 593–609.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Schopler, E., & Reichler, R. (1971). Parents as co-therapists in the treatment of psychotic children. Journal of Autism and Childhood Schizophrenia, 1, 87–102.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Spanier, G. B. (1976). Measuring dyadic adjustment: New scales for assessing the quality of the marriage and similar dyads. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 38, 15–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Stierlin, H., Rucker-Embden, I., Wetzel, N., & Wirsching, M. (1980). The first interview with the family. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  46. Stoneman, Z., Brody, G. H., & Abbott, D., (1983). In-home observations of young Down syndrome children and their mothers and fathers. American Journal of Mental Deficiency, 87, 591–600.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  47. Walsh, F. (1980). The family in later life. In E. A. Carter & M. McGoldrick (Eds.), The family life cycle: A framework for family therapy (pp. 197–220). New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  48. Weitz, S. (1982). A code for assessing teaching skills of parents of developmentally disabled children. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 12, 13–24.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Wikler, L., Wasow, M., & Hatfield, E. (1981). Chronic sorrow revisited: Parent vs. professional depiction of the adjustment of parents of mentally retarded children. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 51, 63–70.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.Applied and Professional PsychologyRutgers UniversityPiscatawayUSA

Personalised recommendations