Behavioral Assessment of Autism

  • Michael D. Powers
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Behavioral assessment is a multimethod approach for gathering information about behavior using procedures that are both empirically validated and developmentally sensitive (Ollendick & Hersen, 1984). In contrast to traditional assessment methods, behavioral assessment emphasizes environmental and organismic control over behavior, reliance on the direct observation of behavior and subsequent deemphasis on inference, consideration of temporal and contextual bases within which the target behavior is embedded (Mash & Terdal, 1981), and the use of multiple assessment methods. The purposes of behavioral assessment are twofold: (1) to aid treatment plnning by providing predictive information with respect to the potential efficacy of one intervention over another, and (2) to monitor and evaluate the effects of the intervention, once implemented.

Keywords

Autistic Child Target Behavior Behavioral Assessment Apply Behavior Analysis Social Validity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael D. Powers
    • 1
  1. 1.Preschool Autism Project, Department of Special EducationUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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