Advertisement

The Nantucket Pine Tip Moth

  • C. Wayne Berisford
Part of the Population Ecology book series (POPE)

Abstract

The Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), is one of the most common forest insects in the eastern United States. It was first discovered and studied on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts,63 where it was causing severe damage to pines and was described as the “frustrating Retinia” (= Rhyacionia).23 The taxonomic status of R. frustrana is generally clear except for its relationship with R. bushnelli Miller, thought by some to be a subspecies.59 The primary difference is that R. frustrana overwinters in infested shoots and R. bushnelli overwinters in the duff and soil beneath the trees.

Keywords

Natural Enemy Site Index Seed Orchard Pitch Canker Christmas Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Allen, D., and Hedden, R. L., Personal communication, Department of Forestry, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Baer, R. G., and Berisford, C. W., 1975, Species composition of pine tip moth, Rhyacionia spp., infestations in northeast Georgia, J. Ga. Entomol. Soc. 10: 64–67.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Baer, R. G., and Berisford, C. W., 1976, Bioassay, histology, and morphology of pheromone-producing glands of Rhyacionia frustrana, R. rigidana and R. subtropica, Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 2: 307–310.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Berisford, C. W., 1974, Species isolation mechanisms in Rhyacionia frustrana and R. rigidana, Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 67: 292–294.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Berisford, C. W., 1974. Comparisons of emergence periods and generations of pine tip moths, Rhyacionia frustrana and R. rigidana, Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 67: 666–668.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Berisford, C. W., 1977, Inhibition of male attraction of the Nantucket pine tip moth by a synthetic pheromone for the pine tip moth, Environ. Entomol. 6: 245–246.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Berisford, C. W., 1982, Pheromones of Rhyacionia spp. identification, function and utility, J. Ga. Entomol. Soc. 17: 23–30 (second suppl.).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Berisford, C. W., and Brady, U. E., 1972, Attraction of Nantucket pine tip moth males to the female sex pheromone, J. Econ. Entomol. 65: 430–435.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Berisford, C. W., and Brady, U. E., 1973, Specificity and inhibition of attraction of Rhyacionia frustrana and R. rigidana to their female sex pheromones, Nature (Lond.) 241: 68–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Berisford, C. W., Debarr, G. L., and Payne, T. L., 1985, Utilization of pheromones in forest pest management, in: Insects and Diseases of Southern Forests (R. A. Goyer and J. P. Jones, eds.), pp. 92–96, Proceedings of the Thirty-fourth Annual Forestry Symposium, Louisiana Agric. Expt. Sta.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Berisford, C. W., Gargiullo, P. M., and Canalos, C. G., 1984, Optimum timing for insecticidal control of the Nantucket pine tip moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), J. Econ. Entomol. 77: 174–177.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Berisford, C. W., Godbee, J. F., and Baer, R. G., 1974, Inhibition of Nantucket pine tip moth (Lepidoptera: Olethreutidae) attraction by small proportion of pitch pine tip moth pheromone, Can. Entomol. 106: 1109–1110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Berisford, C. W., Harman, D. M., Freeman, B. L., Wilkinson, R. C., and McGraw, J. R., 1979, Sex pheromone cross-attraction among four species of pine tip moths, Rhyacionia species, J. Chem. Ecol. 5: 205–210.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Berisford, C. W., and Hedden, R. L., 1978, Suppression of male Rhyacionia frustrana response to live females by the sex pheromone of R. buoliana and R. subtropica, Environ. Entomol. 7: 532–533.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Berisford, C. W., and Kulman, H. M., 1967, Infestation rate and damage by the Nantucket pine tip moth in six loblolly pine stand categories, For. Sci. 13: 428–438.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Berryman, A. A., 1972, Resistance of conifers to invasion by bark beetle–fungus associations, Bioscience 22: 598–602.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Cade, S. C., and Hedden, R. L., 1987, Growth impact of pine tip moth on loblolly pine plantations in the Ouachita mountains of Arkansas, South J. Appl. For. 11: 128–133.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Cade, S. C., and Heikkenen, H. J., 1965, Control of pine tip moths on loblolly pine with systemic insecticides, Ga. For. Res. Pap. No. 32.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Cade, S. C., Runion, G. B., and Bruck, R. I., 1986, Pine tip moth/pitch canker relationships in a coastal North Carolina (USA) loblolly pine plantation, Proc. 18th IUFRO World Cong. Ljuhljana Div. 2: 7–21.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Canalos, C. G., and Berisford, C. W., 1981, Seasonal activity of two sympatric Rhyacionia species determined by pheromone traps, J. Ga. Entomol. Soc. 16: 219–222.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Charles, P. J., Delplanque, A., Marpeau, A., Bernard-Dagan, C., and Arbez, M., 1982, Susceptibility of European black pine (Pinus nigra) to the European pine shoot moth (Rhyacionia buoliana): variations of susceptibility at the provenance and individual level of the pine and effect of terpine composition, pp. 206212, in: Proceedings on Resistance to Diseases and Pests in Forest Trees Workshop, 1980, Pudoe Wageningen, Netherlands.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Clarke, S. R., 1982, Dispersion of the Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), in newly established loblolly pine plantation, Masters thesis, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Comstock, J. H., 1880, Report (1879) of the entomologist, U.S. Dep. Agric. Bur. Entomol., pp. 236–237.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Coyne, J. F., 1968, Simulated Nantucket pine tip moth (Rhyacionia frustrana) attacks reduce root development of shortleaf pine seedlings, J. Econ. Entomol. 61: 319–320.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Eikenbary, R. D., and Fox, R. C., 1965, The parasites of the Nantucket pine tip moth in South Carolina, S.C. Agric. Expt. Sta. Tech. Bull. 1017.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Eikenbary, R. D., and Fox, R. C., 1968, Arthropod predators of the Nantucket pine tip moth Rhyacionia frustrana, Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 61: 1218–1221.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Eikenbary, R. D., and Fox, R. C., 1968, Responses of Nantucket pine tip moth parasites to tree level, orientation and hosts per pine tip, Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 61: 1380–1384.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Freeman, B. L., and Berisford, C. W., 1979, Abundance and parasitic habits of some parasitoids of the Nantucket pine tip moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), Can. Entomol. 111: 509–514.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Gargiullo, P. M., and Berisford, C. W., 1981, Sampling for pine tip moths—A procedural guide, Univ. Ga. Agric. Expt. Sta. Bull. #272.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Gargiullo, P. M., and Berisford, C. W., 1983, Life tables for the Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrano (Comstock), and the pitch pine tip moth, Rhyacionia rigidana (Fernald) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), Environ. Entomol. 12: 1391–1402.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Gargiullo, P. M., Berisford, C. W., Canalos, C. G., Richmond, J. A., and Cade, S. C., 1984, Mathematical descriptions of Rhyacionia frustrano (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) cumulative catches in pheromone traps, cumulative eggs hatching, and their use in timing of chemical control, Environ. Entomol. 13: 1681 1685.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Gargiullo, P. M., Berisford, C. W., and Godbee, J. F., 1985, Prediction of optimal timing for chemical control of the Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrano (Comstock) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in the southeastern coastal plain, J. Econ. Entomol. 78: 148–154.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Gargiullo, P. M., Berisford, C. W., and Pienaar, L. V., 1983, Two-stage cluster sampling for pine tip moths, Environ. Entomol. 12: 81–90.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Gargiullo, P. M., Berisford, C. W., and Richmond, J. A., 1983, How to time insecticide sprays against the Nantucket pine tip moth, Ga. For. Comm. Ga. For. Res. Pap. #44.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Gross, P. M. Personal communication, Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland.Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Hain, F. P., Cook, S. P., Matson, P. A., and Wilson, K. G., 1985, Factors contributing to southern pine beetle host resistance, in: Proceedings of the Integrated Pest Management Research Symposium (S. J. Branham and R. C. Thatcher, eds.), pp. 154–160, USDA For. Serv. Gen. Tech. Rep. SO-56.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Hannan, D. M., and Kulman, H. M., (eds.), 1973, A world survey of the parasites and predators of the genus Rhyacionia, parts I–IV, University of Maryland Nat. Res. Inst. Contrib. #527.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Harris, P., 1960, Production of pine resin and its effect on survival of Rhyacionia buoliana (Schiff.) (Lepidoptera: Olethreutidae), Can. J. Zool. 38: 121–130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Haugen, D. A., and Hedden, R. L. Personal Communication, Department of Forestry, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, and S. C. Cade, Weyerhauser Company, Hot Springs, Arkansas.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Haugen, D. A., and Stephen, F. M., 1983, Developmental rates of Nantucket pine tip moth (Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)) life stages in relation to temperature, Environ. Entomol. 13: 56–60.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Hedden, R. L., and Clason, T., 1980, Nantucket pine tip moth impact on loblolly pine wood and product quality, Forestry Res. Rep. 1979, L.S.U. Agric. Exp. Sta. N. La. Hill Farm Exp. Sta., Homer, La.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Hertel, G. D., and Benjamin, D. M., 1977, Intensity of site preparation influences on pine webworm and tip moth infestations of pine seedlings in North-central Florida, Environ. Entomol. 6: 118–122.Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Hill, A. S., Berisford, C. W., Brady, U. E., and Roelofs, W. L., 1976, Sex pheromone of the pitch pine tip moth, Rhyacionia rigidana, Environ. Entomol. 5: 959–960.Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Hill, A. S., Berisford, C. W., Brady, U. E., and Roelofs, W. L., 1981, Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana: Identification of two sex pheromone components, J. Chem. Ecol. 7: 517–528.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    Holst, M., 1963, Breeding resistance in pines to Rhyacionia moths. World consultation on forest genetics and tree improvement, Food and Agriculture Organization, Stockholm, Sweden.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    Holst, M., and Heimburger, C., 1955, The breeding of hard pine types resistant to European pine shoot moth [Rhyacionia buoliana (Schiff.)], For. Chron. 31: 162–169.Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Hood, W. M., 1986, Hazard rating forest sites for pine tip moth, Rhyacionia spp. in Northwestern South Carolina, Ph.D. dissertation, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia.Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    Hood, W. M., Berisford, C. W., and Hedden, R. L., 1985, Oviposition preferences of the Nantucket pine tip moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) on loblolly and slash pine, J. Entomol. Sci. 20: 204–206.Google Scholar
  49. 49.
    Lashomb, J. H., Steinhauer, A. L., and Diveby, G., 1980, Comparison of parasitism and infestation of Nantucket pine tip moth in different aged stands of loblolly pine, Environ. Entomol. 9: 397–402.Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    Lashomb, J. H., Steinhauer, A. L., and Douglass, L., 1978, Impact studies of Nantucket pine tip moth populations on loblolly pine, Environ. Entomol. 7: 910–912.Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    McLeod, P. J., Wallis, G. W., Yearian, W. C., Stephen, F. M., and Young, S. Y., 1983, Evaluation of codling moth granulosis virus for Nantucket pine tip moth suppression, J. Ga. Entomol. Soc. 18: 424–427.Google Scholar
  52. Merkel, E. P., Squillace, A. E., and Bengtson, G. W., 1965, Evidence of inherent resistance to Dioryctria infestation pp. 96–99, in: Proceedings of the Eighth Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference 1965. Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    Miller, F. D., and Stephen, F. M., 1983, Effects of competing vegetation on Nantucket pine tip moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) populations in loblolly pine plantations in Arkansas, Environ. Entomol. 12: 10 1105.Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    Miller, J. M., 1950, Resistance of pine hybrids to the pine reproduction weevil, USDA For. Sent. Res. Note No. 68.Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    Miller, W. E., 1967, The European pine shoot moth—ecology and control in the lake states, For. Sci. Monog. 14: 1–72.Google Scholar
  56. 56.
    Miller, W. E., and Wilson, L. F., 1964, Composition and diagnosis of pine tip moth infestations in the Southeast, J. Econ. Entomol. 57: 722–726.Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    Moms, R. F., 1959, Single-factor analysis in population dynamics, Ecology 40: 580–588.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. 58.
    Paine, T. D., Stephen, F. M., and Cates, R. G., 1985, Induced defenses against Dendroctonus frontalis and associated fungi: Variation in loblolly pine resistance, in: Proceedings of the Integrated Pest Management Research Symposium (S. J. Branham and R. C. Thatcher, eds.), pp. 169–176, USDA For. Serv. Gen. Tech. Rep. SO-56.Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    Powell, J. A., and Miller, W. E., 1978, Nearctic pine tip moths of the genus Rhyacionia: Biosystematic review (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae, Olethreutidae ), USDA Agric. Handbook No. 514.Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    Raffa, K. F., and Berryman, A. A., 1983, The role of host plant resistance in the colonization behavior and ecology of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), Ecol. Monog. 53: 27–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. 61.
    Roelofs, W. L., Hill, A. S., Berisford, C. W., and Godbee, J. F., 1979, Sex pheromone of the subtropical pine tip moth, Rhyacionia subtropica, Environ. Entomol. 8: 894–895.Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    Scriven, G. T., and Luck, R. F., 1978, Natural enemy promises control of Nantucket pine tip moth, Calif. Agric. 32: 19–20.Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    Scudder, S. H., 1883, The pine moth of Nantucket—Retinia frustrana, Pub. Mass. Soc. Promotion of Agric.Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    Smith, R. C., Daterman, G. E., Daves, G. D., McMurtrey, K. D., and Roelofs, W. L., 1974, Sex pheromone of the European pine shoot moth: Chemical identification and field tests, J. Insect Physiol. 20: 661–668.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. 65.
    Stephen, F. M., 1983, Nantucket pine tip moth in forest stands, in: History, Status, and Future Needs for Entomology Research in Southern Forests. Proceedings of the Tenth Anniversary of the East Texas Forest and Entomology Seminar, Kurth Lake, Texas (T. L. Payne and R. N. Coulson, eds. ), pp. 53–58.Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    Stephen, F. M., Wallis, G. W., Colvin, R. J., Young, J. F., and Warren, L. 0., 1982, Pine tree growth and yield: Influence of species, plant spacings, vegetation, and pine tip moth control, Ark. Farm Res. 31: 10.Google Scholar
  67. 67.
    Wadley, F. M., 1932, Minutes of the 434th regular meeting of the Entomological Society of Washington, Jan. 7, 1932, Proc. Wash. Entomol. Soc. 34: 26–28.Google Scholar
  68. 68.
    Varley, G. C., and Gradwell, G. R., 1960, Key factors in population studies, J. Anim. Ecol. 31: 917–943.Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    Warren, L. 0., 1963, Nantucket pine tip moth infestations, severity of attack as influenced by vegetative competition in pine stands, Ark. Farm Res. 12: 2.Google Scholar
  70. 70.
    Warren, L. 0., 1985, Primary hymenopterous parasites of Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), J. Entomol. Sci. 20: 383–389.Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    Webb, J. W., and Berisford, C. W., 1978, Temperature modification of flight and response to pheromones in Rhyacionia frustrana, Environ. Entomol. 7: 278–280.Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    White, M. N., Kulhavy, D. L., and Conner, R. N., 1984, Nantucket pine tip moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) infestation rates related to site and stand characteristics in Nacogdoches county Texas, Environ. Entomol. 13: 1598–1601.Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    Williston, H. L., and Barras, S. J., 1977, Impact of tip moth injury on growth and yield on 16-year old loblolly and shortleaf pine, USDA For. Serv. Res. Note SO-221.Google Scholar
  74. 74.
    Yates, H. O. III, 1962, Influence of tip moth larvae on oleoresin crystallization of southern pine, Southeast. For. Exp. Stn., Asheville, NC Res. Note No. 174.Google Scholar
  75. 75.
    Yates, H. O. III, 1966, Rhyacionia egg parasitism by Trichogramma minutum Riley, J. Econ. Entomol. 59: 967–968.Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    Yates, H. O. III, 1966, Susceptibility of loblolly and slash pines to Rhyacionia spp. oviposition, injury and damage, J. Econ. Entomol. 59: 1461–1464.Google Scholar
  77. 77.
    Yates, H. O. III, 1967, Key to nearctic parasites of the genus Rhyacionia with species annotations, USDA For. Serv. Publ. USDA U.S. For. Serv. Asheville, NC.Google Scholar
  78. 78.
    Yates, H. O. III, 1970, Control of pine tip moths Rhyacionia spp. (Lepidoptera: Olethreutidae) on seed orchards with phorate, J. Ga. Entomol. Soc. 5: 100–104.Google Scholar
  79. 79.
    Yates, H. O. III, and Ebel, B. H., 1972, Shortleaf pine conelet loss caused by the Nantucket pine tip moth. Rhyacionia frustrana (Lepidoptera: Olethreutidae), Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 65: 100–104.Google Scholar
  80. 80.
    Yates, H. O. III, Overgaard, N. A., and Koerber, T. W., 1981, Nantucket pine tip moth, USDA For. Ser., For. Insect and Disease Leaflet, No. 70.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Wayne Berisford
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EntomologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensGeorgia

Personalised recommendations