The Mountain Pine Beetle in Western North America

  • Kenneth F. Raffa
Part of the Population Ecology book series (POPE)

Abstract

The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is generally considered the most destructive of all Western forest insects.46 Periodic outbreaks may devastate entire forests, comprising millions of hectares. Between 1979 and 1983, more than 79 million trees were killed by this insect in the United States alone.57 Total North American losses to the mountain pine beetle are estimated at above 2 billion board-feet per year.86,87 In addition to the severe timber losses, mountain pine beetle outbreaks may affect watershed quality, wildlife composition, and recreational value.57 The accumulation of dead wood is a major fuel source for subsequent wildfires.5

Keywords

Bark Beetle Aggregation Pheromone Beetle Population Mountain Pine Beetle Microbial Symbiont 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth F. Raffa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EntomologyUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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