The Japanese Pine Sawyer

  • Fujio Kobayashi
Part of the Population Ecology book series (POPE)

Abstract

The major pine species in Japan, Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) and Japanese black pine (P. thunbergii), have suffered heavy mortality for several decades. Many beetle species are found under the bark of dead trees, including the Japanese pine sawyer, Monochamus alteratus Hope. On the basis of field observations, entomologists assumed that trees had been diseased before beetle attacks. A research project begun in 1968 proved that the causal agent of the disease was the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus lignicolus Mamiya et Kiyohara, which was subsequently reclassified as B. xylophilus (Steiner and Buhrer) Nickle. Intensive inspection of the insects associated with dead pine trees demonstrated that the principal vector of the nematode was M. alternatus.12,20

Keywords

Dead Tree Tree Mortality Adult Beetle Pine Wilt Disease Beetle Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fujio Kobayashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Forestry and Forest Products Research InstituteTsukuba, Ibaraki, 305Japan

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