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Sirex in Australasia

  • John L. Madden
Part of the Population Ecology book series (POPE)

Abstract

Woodwasps or horntails (Siricidae) are primitive phytophagous hymenopterans that naturally infest a variety of coniferous and hardwood trees throughout North America, Eurasia, North Africa, and Japan.10,13,27,36,42,43,55,75,78 Although woodwasps have been reported to be responsible for economic degradation of otherwise marketable timber,5,35,55,73,77,85 such infestations are more symptomatic of a prior pathological condition than a primary cause of tree mortality.19 Therefore, in their natural habitat, wood-wasps are secondary to other predisposing agents, which may include defoliation or debilitation of trees by insect and/or fungal attack,6,19 fire or smog damage,15,16 and mechanical injury.46

Keywords

Host Tree Tree Mortality Female Wasp Flight Season Average Rain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • John L. Madden
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Agricultural ScienceUniversity of TasmaniaHobartAustralia

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