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The Spruce Budworm in Eastern North America

  • William J. Mattson
  • Gary A. Simmons
  • John A. Witter
Part of the Population Ecology book series (POPE)

Abstract

The spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens), (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) was first described from specimens collected in Virginia,17 but this native insect occurs primarily in the northern boreal forest from Newfoundland west to the McKenzie River near 66°N.53 The most extensive and destructive outbreaks have occurred in the maritime provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland), Quebec, Ontario, Maine, and the Great Lakes states. This defoliator feeds primarily on the new growth of balsam fir (Abies balsamea), red spruce (Picea rubens), white spruce (Picea glauca), and black spruce (Picea mariana). Sometimes it feeds on other conifers, such as eastern larch (Larix lancina), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii), subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa), and eastern white pine (Pinus strobus).28,47

Keywords

Staminate Flower Choristoneura Fumiferana Spruce Budworm Outbreak Canadian Forestry Great Lake State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Mattson
    • 1
  • Gary A. Simmons
    • 2
  • John A. Witter
    • 3
  1. 1.U.S.D.A. Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station, Pesticide Research CenterMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  2. 2.Department of EntomologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  3. 3.School of Natural ResourcesUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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