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Coping with Extreme Trauma

  • Eva Kahana
  • Boaz Kahana
  • Zev Harel
  • Tena Rosner
Part of the The Springer Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

In an effort to address research challenges posed by the study of coping with extremely stressful life events, this chapter will outline a conceptual framework provided by a dynamic consideration of immediate and long-term coping with trauma and will consider the relationship of coping to psychological well-being. Although we consider such a fremework to be useful and necessary, we will also point to limitations of current research in operationalizing such a framework, especially as it relates to extreme stress and long-term adaptation. Specific illustrations of the suggested paradigm will be provided from the literature and from our study of coping efforts of Holocaust victims during the period of victimization and by survivors in the aftermath of the Holocaust.

Keywords

Coping Strategy Coping Behavior Concentration Camp Coping Response Extreme Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva Kahana
    • 1
  • Boaz Kahana
    • 2
  • Zev Harel
    • 3
  • Tena Rosner
    • 1
  1. 1.Elderly Care Research Center, Department of SociologyCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCleveland State UniversityClevelandUSA
  3. 3.Center on Applied Gerontological Research, Department of Social ServiceCleveland State UniversityClevelandUSA

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