Post-Traumatic Self Disorders (PTsfD)

Theoretical and Practical Considerations in Psychotherapy of Vietnam War Veterans
  • Erwin Randolph Parson
Part of the The Springer Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

People who have endured extreme stress suffer a profound rupture in the very fabric of the self. The manifestations of this rupture go far beyond mere symptomatic expressions; they go deep to the core of the self, tearing asunder and cutting through its biological and psychic integrity. In tandem with this self-rupturing is the shattering of the survivor’s object world, which Terrence DesPres (1976) observed in survivors of the Holocaust. He observed that many had lost faith in the capacity of human beings for goodness. Similarly, Lifton (1980) describes the severed connectivity between self and others among survivors in his concept of the “broken connection.”

Keywords

Extreme Stress Vietnam Veteran Combat Veteran Veteran Patient Narcissistic Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erwin Randolph Parson
    • 1
  1. 1.Parson Associates, Inc.AlbanyUSA

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