Infectious Disease Problems for the Traveler

  • Richard B. Brown

Abstract

Travel has become far more routine than has historically been appreciated. Estimates indicate that up to eight million Americans travel to underdeveloped countries annually.1 It is now common for people of all ages and backgrounds to travel regularly to domestic and foreign locations. In doing so, individuals must confront many issues and health risks not present in their home environs, and they often seek attention for many of these matters. Indeed, recent studies suggest that depending on itinerary, 15–75% of travelers may develop illness during or after foreign travel.2 Advice and information for travelers can come from many sources that include the library, physicians, friends, and travel agents. Considerations that need to be addressed can include many that are “noninfectious,” such as insurance coverage in foreign lands, availability of prescription medications, special needs of impaired travelers, remedies for motion sickness, etc. Table 2.1 depicts many of the important noninfectious disease issues that all travelers should consider prior to embarking on substantial travel.

Keywords

Typhoid Fever Motion Sickness Yellow Fever Measle Vaccine Oral Polio Vaccine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard B. Brown

There are no affiliations available

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