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Rise of Complex Societies in Italy: Historical Versus Archaeological Perspectives

  • Stephen L. Dyson

Abstract

In the Italian peninsula during the first millennium B.C., there existed at various periods complex cultural systems which achieved at their peak a proto-state or full state level of organization. One of these, the Greek city-state group of Sicily and southern Italy, was a colonial implant from the eastern Mediterranean which from the eighth century to the second century B.C. developed its own distinctive western Mediterranean characteristics (Boardman 1964). A second such complex cultural system was represented by the city-states of the Etruscans whose heartland was located just north of Rome. The Etruscans are now regarded by most archaeologists as a cultural group which evolved from Iron Age roots in the Italian peninsula, albeit with strong influence from the Greek world (Pallottino 1978; Torelli 1986).

Keywords

Rural Site Roman Period Italian Peninsula Marketing System Large Estate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen L. Dyson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ClassicsWesleyan UniversityMiddletownUSA

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