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Image of the Enemy

Critical Parameters, Cultural Variations
  • Loran B. Szalay
  • Elahe Mir-Djalali

Abstract

It is broadly recognized that perceptions distorted by hostile feelings are aggravating international conflicts. They frequently become potent forces rushing people into military confrontations and possibly war. Compared to the general psychological mechanisms promoting this dangerous process, relatively little attention has been given to how the distorted perceptions and images are actually shaped by cultural dispositions. This is due to the hidden nature of these dispositions evasive to objective, empirical assess­ment. The lack of such insights hampers efforts to defuse international conflicts.

Keywords

United States International Conflict Korean Student Perceptual Distortion Cultural Frame 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Loran B. Szalay
    • 1
  • Elahe Mir-Djalali
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Comparative Social and Cultural StudiesChevy ChaseUSA
  2. 2.Rapport, Inc.Chevy ChaseUSA

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