The World Is a Dangerous Place

Images of the Enemy on Children’s Television
  • Petra Hesse
  • John E. Mack

Abstract

Even after the recent, successful summit meeting, images of allies and enemies continue to affect many contemporary political conflicts. They fueled not only the arms race of the superpowers and the war between Iran and Iraq but also apartheid in South Africa and international terrorism. While nobody would question the role images of allies and enemies play in all of these contexts, their origins and developmental history in children are not well understood.

Keywords

Apply Social Psychology Dangerous Place United States Government Printing Evil People Evil Force 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Petra Hesse
    • 1
  • John E. Mack
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Psychological Studies in the Nuclear Age, Cambridge HospitalHarvard Medical SchoolCambridgeUK

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