High-Dose Carboplatin with Peripheral Blood Stem Cell and Growth Factor Support

  • Thomas C. Shea
  • James R. Mason
  • Anna Maria Storniolo
  • Barbara Newton
  • Margaret Breslin
  • Michael Mullen
  • David Ward
  • Raymond Taetle

Abstract

The administration of high-dose chemotherapy has resulted in a marked increase in the frequency of both partial and complete responses in a large number of patients with solid and hematologic malignancies. This approach has led to long term remission and probable cure rates of 20–60% in patients with Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Similar results have also been obtained in treating children with neuroblastoma and adults with first and second remission acute myelogenous leukemia1,2. While data on the long term results of high-dose therapy in breast cancer patients is less extensive, several reports do suggest that such regimens can prolong disease free survival for patients treated early in the course of their metastatic disease or in the adjuvant setting for women at high risk of early relapse3–6.

Keywords

Clin Oncol Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Capillary Leak Syndrome Germ Cell Cancer Growth Factor Support 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas C. Shea
    • 1
  • James R. Mason
    • 1
  • Anna Maria Storniolo
    • 1
  • Barbara Newton
    • 1
  • Margaret Breslin
    • 1
  • Michael Mullen
    • 1
  • David Ward
    • 1
  • Raymond Taetle
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of California, San DiegoSan DiegoUSA

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