Signal Transduction Pathway Regulation of DDP Sensitivity

  • Stephen B. Howell
  • Seiji Isonishi
  • Randolph C. Christen
  • Paul A. Andrews
  • Stephen C. Mann
  • Doreen Hom

Abstract

Signal transduction pathways play a central role in the regulation of cellular behavior, including growth and differentiation. It has been known for some time that the toxicity of many cancer chemotherapeutic agents is dependent on the activity of the biochemical pathway which they target. The hypothesis which we have been investigating is that growth factors, hormones and chemicals that activate signal transduction pathways can influence sensitivity to cisplatin (DDP). These studies have been conducted using ovarian carcinoma cell lines because they are representative of a type of tumor that is usually initially responsive to DDP chemotherapy in vivo.

Keywords

Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Line Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen B. Howell
    • 1
  • Seiji Isonishi
    • 1
  • Randolph C. Christen
    • 1
  • Paul A. Andrews
    • 1
  • Stephen C. Mann
    • 1
  • Doreen Hom
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Cancer CenterUniversity of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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