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Adult Survivors after Suicide

Research Problems and Needs
  • Norman L. Farberow

Abstract

It is primarily within the past decade that survivors after suicide have begun to receive the professional concern and research attention their difficult emotional experience has warranted. Research into the area was practically nonexistent in the 1960s, was minimal in the 1970s, and in the late 1980s has, at best, been only sparse. As a result many unanswered questions and much misinformation about the event remains. The lack of answers and information, however, has not prevented the proliferation of clinical programs both in the United States and in Canada. A survey of the literature over the past two decades revealed that of the roughly 250 publications dealing with survivorship, all but 15% describe the establishment and the functioning of group counseling programs. Most of these reports appeared in Proceedings of the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) Annual Meetings and a few appeared in the International Association of Suicide Biennial Congresses but most often they were descriptions or summary reports containing few, if any, details. There are some indications, however, that professional awareness of the needs of survivors has begun to change. Survivors of suicide have now received official recognition from the AAS with the establishment of a permanent Committee on Survivors, the sponsoring of a National Conference of Survivors conducted for and by them, and the publication of a newsletter written for and by them.

Keywords

Survivor Group Adult Survivor Suicide Prevention Natural Death Patient Suicide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman L. Farberow
    • 1
  1. 1.The Suicide Prevention Center of the Family Services of Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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