Suicide in the Young Adult

  • Antoon A. Leenaars

Abstract

In recent years, a great deal of attention has been focused on suicide in the young. However, by expanding one’s view of “young,” it becomes immediately obvious that young adults are more at risk than other groups of young people. Indeed, one of the most concerning trends in suicide today is the alarming rate of suicide—and parasuicide—for young adults. Very recent research, including research on the suicide notes they leave, demonstrates a very important observation on this at-risk group: the suicide of young adults is different from that of other adults.

Keywords

Young Adult Young Adulthood Suicide Rate Late Adulthood Middle Adulthood 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antoon A. Leenaars
    • 1
  1. 1.Private PracticeWindsorCanada

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