Forensic Issues in Head Trauma

Neuropsychological Perspectives of Social Security Disability and Worker’s Compensation
  • Antonio E. Puente
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Specific concerns have arisen over the past few years in the application of the rapidly developing field of clinical neuropsychology to the legal setting. Due to the intrinsic nature of head trauma, a significant and increasing number of these types of cases eventually have legal implications.

Keywords

Social Security Referral Source Forensic Case Social Security Administration Mild Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonio E. Puente
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at WilmingtonWilmingtonUSA

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