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Job-Oriented Rehabilitation

  • Michael McCue
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Severe head injury typically results in a number of physical, cognitive, and emotional limitations. Most commonly, problems such as impulsivity, the inability to learn effectively, remember new information, and control behavior, as well as a lack of self-awareness are found in persons who have sustained severe head injury. In addition, depending upon the nature and location of the injury, a myriad of other limitations may occur (e.g., hemiparesis, emotional lability and affective disturbances, perceptual difficulties, and language problems). Because of the broad nature and severity of problems associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), vocational rehabilitation with this population is difficult (Ben-Yishay, Silver, Piasetsky, & Rattok, 1987; Brinkley, 1989; Brooks, McKinlay, Symington, Beattie, & Campsie, 1987; Kreutzer, Wehman, Morton, & Stonnington, 1988).

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Vocational Rehabilitation Severe Head Injury Cognitive Rehabilitation Disable Worker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael McCue
    • 1
  1. 1.Behavioral Neuropsychology AssociatesPittsburghUSA

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