Group Psychotherapy with Brain-Damaged Adults and Their Families

  • Warren T. Jackson
  • William Drew Gouvier
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

In the past, cognitive and behavioral sequelae of neurological insult were thought to contraindicate psychotherapeutic intervention with brain-damaged adults. Recently, however, the cultivation of awareness of deficits, self-appraisal techniques, and adaptive skills have become important objectives for postacute rehabilitation of such patients. Meeting these objectives can be a critical obstacle to successful community reentry. In this context, psychotherapy is becoming a viable therapeutic tool (Rosenthal, 1989).

Keywords

Brain Injury Group Psychotherapy Psychotherapeutic Intervention Family Assessment Device Poststroke Depression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Warren T. Jackson
    • 1
  • William Drew Gouvier
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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