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Neuropsychological Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury in the Intensive Care and Acute Care Environment

  • J. Michael Williams
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Most clinical neuropsychological evaluations of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are performed at least three months after the onset of injury. Although the neuropsychologist may assess a brain-injured patient early in recovery to establish severity or localization of injury, most evaluations of head trauma patients are used to establish functional ability levels and to plan for discharge placement and a rehabilitation program (Prigatano, Fordyce, Zeiner, Roueche, Pepping, & Wood, 1984). While currently few clinicians regularly practice in the trauma center, the use of neuropsychological assessment in the acute care environment represents a potentially new setting for neuropsychologists to monitor cognitive function. Early neuropsychological evaluation can also provide a valuable clinical service for the treatment and management of TBI.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Head Injury Trauma Patient Trauma Center Neuropsychological Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Michael Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.Neuropsychology LaboratoryHahnemann UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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