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The Executive Board System

An Innovative Approach to Cognitive-Behavioral Rehabilitation in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Ronald F. Zec
  • Randolph W. Parks
  • Janice Gambach
  • Sandra Vicari
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Traumatic brain injuries often result in frontal lobe damage, in addition to diffuse damage, from the impact of the frontal lobes against the protruding frontal bones (Levin, Benton, & Grossman, 1982). Frontal lobe damage produces behavioral, emotional, and cognitive problems, especially impaired executive functioning (Lezak, 1983; Sohlberg & Mateer, 1989). Memory and attentional deficits are also very common long-term sequelae after traumatic brain injuries due to diffuse brain damage that affects both the medial temporal lobe structures and the brain stem. Although impairments in executive functions (e.g., planning, self-monitoring, self-correction) largely determine the extent of psychosocial and vocational recovery following head injury, rehabilitation efforts have been minimal (Sohlberg & Mateer, 1989).

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Executive Function Executive Functioning Task Analysis Metacognitive Skill 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald F. Zec
    • 1
  • Randolph W. Parks
    • 2
  • Janice Gambach
    • 2
  • Sandra Vicari
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine (Division of Neurology), and the Center for Alzheimer Disease and Related DisordersSouthern Illinois University School of MedicineSpringfieldUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatrySouthern Illinois University School of MedicineSpringfieldUSA

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