PEG-Derivatized Ligands with Hydrophobic and Immunological Specificity

Applications in Cell Separation
  • Donald E. Brooks
  • James M. Van Alstine
  • Kim A. Sharp
  • S. Jill Stocks
Part of the Topics in Applied Chemistry book series (TAPP)

Abstract

In the last few years the use of poly(ethylene glycol) (or PEG) as an agent with which to modify the properties of macromolecules and surfaces has greatly increased, as witnessed by the contributions in this volume. In most instances, PEG is used because it exhibits the interesting property of being highly compatible with water (i.e., highly water soluble) while exhibiting strong incompatibility with a wide variety of other water-soluble substances. Incompatibility means that an unfavorable free-energy change occurs when a second species interacts with a solvated PEG molecule, resulting in a statistical tendency for the second species to be excluded from the region within or near the PEG chain. Such excluded volume effects are manifested in a variety of ways, including phase separation in mixtures with a second water-soluble polymer of salt, enhanced exclusion of PEG from chromatographic gel beads relative to other polymers of similar molecular weight, protein precipitation and reduced binding of external proteins to surfaces or molecules derivatized with PEG.1,2 Many of these kinds of interactions are described in this book.

Keywords

Critical Micelle Concentration Fatty Acid Ester Affinity Ligand Bottom Phase Lipid Head Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald E. Brooks
    • 1
  • James M. Van Alstine
    • 1
  • Kim A. Sharp
    • 1
  • S. Jill Stocks
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pathology and ChemistryUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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