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Genes, Stress, and Cardiovascular Reactivity

  • Richard J. Rose
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

People differ in the magnitude and duration of cardiovascular response to stress. Individual reaction to the stressful experience of everyday life and the controlled stressors of laboratory experiments varies substantially. These individual differences are stable over time and across situations (see Chapter 1), and they are associated with one’s family history of cardiovascular disease (see Chapter 9). To briefly summarize decades of research, individual differences in cardiovascular stress reactivity aggregate in families and characterize individuals. The origin of the differences is due primarily to genetic variation transmitted across generations.

Keywords

Cardiovascular Reactivity Genetic Disposition Twin Brother Cynical Hostility Twin Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard J. Rose
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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