Differential Responses to Salt Intake-Stress Interactions

Relevance to Hypertension
  • Kathleen C. Light
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

There is a well-established literature in the field of hypertension documenting an association between higher dietary salt intake and elevated blood pressure. As long ago as 1904, Ambard and Beajard published a report showing that some hypertensive patients demonstrate a substantial reduction in blood pressure when they restrict their salt intake (cited in Tobian & Hanlon, 1990). Since then, numerous additional clinical investigations have documented beneficial lowering of elevated pressure in many hypertensive patients. Additionally, crosscultural comparisons have highlighted the fact that societies where the average daily salt intake is less than half of that consumed in the United States demonstrate a parallel reduction in the incidence of hypertension while societies consuming more salt show an even higher incidence. Furthermore, “salt-sensitive” and “salt-resistant” animal models have been developed and studied in which the direct causal role of high salt intake in the pathogenesis of hypertension and related cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has been verified. (For reviews, see MacGregor, 1983; Meneely & Battarbee, 1976; Meneely & Dahl, 1961).

Keywords

Salt Intake Sodium Excretion Stress Exposure Mental Arithmetic Cold Pressor Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen C. Light
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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