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Attachment and Bonding

  • Inge Bretherton
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

During the 1960s and 1970s, ethological concepts came to hold much fascination for theoreticians of human development. Animal studies on dominance hierarchies and on social bonds were especially influential. Field observations of developing parent-offspring bonds in birds (e.g., Lorenz, 1935/1957; Lorenz, 1957; Tinbergen, 1951) and mammals, especially nonhuman primates (e.g., DeVore, 1965), provided novel ways of thinking about and of studying the human infant’s attachment to parents, as well as human parents’ attachment to their infants. Previously unfamiliar terms, such as imprinting, critical period, supernormal stimulus and fixed action pattern, entered developmental psychologists’ vocabulary.

Keywords

Child Development Autobiographical Memory Attachment Theory Attachment Relationship Attachment Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Inge Bretherton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child and Family StudiesUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA

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