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Abstract

The lifespan perspective of marriage becomes broader and more complicated each year. First, the “normal” family household unit in America, popularly idealized to be the traditional nuclear family composed of working father, housekeeping mother, and the children is fast becoming a myth. Today the majority of household units in our country is headed by single adults and single parents (Norton, 1983). When husband and wife are living together, in approximately half the cases, both husbands and wives work (Locksley, 1980). Second, increased longevity has expanded dramatically the postparental and the old age stages of marital life into new lifespan phenomena. Third, the changing role of women has had a powerful impact on marriage over the past two decades. Fourth, the empirical support for relationships between marital satisfaction and life cycle stages lags far behind the theoretical descriptions of these relationships.

Keywords

Family Therapy Marital Satisfaction Divorce Rate Life Cycle Stage Marital Quality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary R. Birchler
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Veterans Affairs Medical CenterSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.University of California School of MedicineSan DiegoUSA

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