Adolescence and Family Interaction

  • Susan B. Silverberg
  • Daniel L. Tennenbaum
  • Theodore Jacob
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

Since the early 1980s, the area of adolescence and the family has become one of the most rapidly growing fields in social science research. Although interest in, and conclusions about, family relations at this point in the lifespan find strong origins in the psychoanalytic writings and clinical work of the 1950s (e.g., A. Freud, 1958), they have undergone major transformations since that time—especially over the past 15 years. The psychoanalytic model painted a picture of inevitable stress, tension, and hostility in family relations at adolescence. And, indeed, this negative image, also apparent in early sociological writings (e.g., Davis, 1940), has shaped our popular stereotypes about adolescence and is still maintained by many parents and clinicians today (Offer, Ostrov, & Howard, 1981). Systematic empirical research conducted since the early 1970s has tempered this storm-and-stress portrayal considerably. In place of the earlier emphasis on conflict and detachment between parents and adolescents, there is growing agreement among scholars regarding the significance of family ties at adolescence and the reciprocal influence between adolescents and their families (Powers, Hauser, & Kilner, 1989). Current research suggests that parent-child relations do not change in dramatic ways at adolescence; rather the transition from childhood to adolescence marks a time of important, if subtle, realignments in parent-child relations (see reviews by Collins, 1990 and Steinberg, 1990).

Keywords

Eating Disorder Child Development Parenting Style Early Adolescence Family Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan B. Silverberg
    • 1
  • Daniel L. Tennenbaum
    • 2
  • Theodore Jacob
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Family StudiesUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyKent State UniversityKentUSA

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