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Interpersonal Problem Solving and Social Competence in Children

  • Kenneth H. Rubin
  • Linda Rose-Krasnor
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

Well-known sayings, quotations, and proverbs help provide us with bases for understanding socially acceptable thoughts and deeds. Generally, in Western cultures, it is believed that adherence to the Golden Rule and acting in a charitable manner will lead to interpersonal and intrapersonal profit, whereas those who subscribe to Machiavellian rhetoric will suffer because of his or her own moral ignorance, selfishness, and vice. In short, common sense dictates that those whose social behaviors are judged to be skillful, successful, and acceptable over time and across settings will lead productive, honorable, and successful lives. Those judged as incompetent are predicted to suffer a variety of malevolent consequences.

Keywords

Social Skill Social Competence Social Goal Social Dilemma Interpersonal Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth H. Rubin
    • 1
  • Linda Rose-Krasnor
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyBrock UniversitySt. CatharinesCanada

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