Homelessness and the Housing Crisis

  • Jacqueline Leavitt
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

The housing crisis has generated scores of homeless households, creating a community crisis. In turn, widespread homelessness has heightened awareness of the housing crisis. Homeless people are everywhere. Some create their own turf; others wander through an entire community, no longer confining themselves or being confined to the traditional skid row or Bowery.1 Their visibility challenges the community to respond.

Keywords

Sexual Harassment Public Housing Median Income Urban Renewal Rental Housing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Hopper K, Hamberg J: The Making of America’s Homeless: From Skid Row to New Poor 1945–1984. New York, Community Service Society, 1984.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Galbreath S: Assisting the homeless: Policies and resources. Journal of Housing 43:211–216, 1986.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Erickson J, Wilhelm C (eds): Housing the Homeless. New Brunswick, Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University, 1986.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Rainwater, L: Fear and the house-as-haven in the lower class. Journal of the American Planning Association 32:23–31, 1966.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Duncan, JS (ed): Housing and Identity: Cross-cultural Perspectives. New York, Holmes and Meier Publishers, Inc., 1982.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Sternlieb G, Hughes JW (eds): Demographics and housing in America. Population Bulletin 41:2–35, 1986.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Bianchi SM, Spain D: American Women in Transition. New York, Russell Sage Foundation, 1986.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Jacob JE: Overview of black America in 1985, in Williams JD(ed): The State of Black America 1986. Washington, DC, National Urban League, 1986.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    US Bureau of the Census: Annual Housing Survey: Parts B and C. Washington, DC, US Government Printing Office, 1984.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Sternlieb G, Hughes JW (eds): The Future of Rental Housing. New Brunswick, Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University, 1981.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Vanhorenbeck S: Demographic changes and housing needs. Congressional Research Review 7:15–16, 1986.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Dolbeare C: Federal Housing Assistance: Who Needs It? Who Gets It? Washington, DC, National League of Cities, 1985.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Hartman C: The housing part of the homeless problem, in Bassuk EL (ed): The Mental Health Needs of Homeless Persons. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass, 1986.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Leavitt J, Saegert S: From Abandonment to Hope: Community-Households in Harlem. New York, Columbia University Press, 1990.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    US President’s Commission on Housing: Report of the President’s Commission on Housing. Washington, DC, US Government Printing Office, 1982.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Burns LS, Grebler L: The Future of Housing Markets: A New Appraisal. New York, Plenum Press, 1986.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Garza JS: Hispanic America: Limited housing options, in US Commission of Human Rights: A Sheltered Crisis: The State of Fair Housing in the Eighties. Washington, DC, US Government Printing Office, 1983.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Petry A: The Street. Cambridge, Houghton Mifflin, 1946.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Edel M: Filtering in a private housing market, in Edel M, Rothenberg J (eds): Readings in Urban Economics. New York, Macmillan, 1972.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Adams CT: Homelessness in the post-industrial city: Views from London and Philadelphia Urban Affairs Quarterly 21:527–549, 1986.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Bratt RG: Public housing: The controversy and contribution, in Bratt RG, Hartman C, Meyerson A (eds): Critical Perspectives on Housing. Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1986.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Struyk RJ, Mayer N, Tuccillo JA: Federal Housing Policy at President Reagan’s Midterm. Washington, DC, Urban Institute Press, 1983.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Dolbeare C: The low-income housing crisis, in Hartman C (ed): America’s Housing Crisis: What Is To Be Done? Boston, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Salerno D, Hopper K, Baxter E: Hardship in the Heartland: Homelessness in Eight U.S. Cities. New York, Community Service Society, 1984.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    US Conference of Mayors: Rebuilding America’s Cities. Cambridge, Ballinger, 1986.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Buying a home found easier. New York Times, December 1, 1986, p 28.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Hartman C: Introduction: A radical perspective on housing reform, in Bratt R, Hartman C, Meyerson A (eds): Critical Perspectives on Housing. Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1986.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Frieden BJ, Kaplan M: The Politics of Neglect: Urban Aid from Model Cities to Revenue Sharing. Cambridge, MIT Press, 1975.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Schwartz H, Abies P: Planning for the Lower East Side. New York, Praeger, 1973.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Marcuse P: Abandonment, gentrification, and displacement: The linkages in New York City, in Smith N, Williams P (eds): Gentrification of the City. Boston, Allen & Unwin, 1986.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Spain D: The extent, causes and consequences of urban gentrification, in US Commission on Civil Rights: A Sheltered Crisis: The State of Fair Housing in the Eighties. Washington, DC, 1983.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Angotti T: Housing strategies: The limits of local action. Journal of Housing 43:197–206, 1986.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Legates RT, Hartman C: The anatomy of displacement in the United States, in Smith N, Williams P (eds): Gentrification of the City. Boston, Allen & Unwin, 1986.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Hartman C, Keating D, LeGates R: Displacement: How to Fight It. Berkeley, National Housing Law Project, p 3, 1982.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Greer NR: The Search for Shelter. Washington, DC, American Institute of Architects, 1986.Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Noble G: Housing the homeless. Economic Development and Law Center Report 16:4–11, 1986.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Kasinitz P: Gentrification and homelessness: The single room occupant and the inner city revival. In Erickson J, Wilhelm C (eds): Housing the Homeless. New Brunswick, Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University, 1986.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Sloss M: The crisis of homelessness: Its dimensions and solutions. Urban and Social Change Review 17:18–20, Summer 1984.Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Crystal S, Goldstein M: The Homeless in New York City Shelters. New York, Human Resources Administration, 1984.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Stoner M: The plight of homeless women, in Erickson J, Wilhelm C (eds): Housing the Homeless. New Brunswick, Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University, 1986.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Lane JB: Jacob A. Riis and the American City. Port Washington, NY, Kennikat, 1974.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Merina V: City seeks legal tools to combat crowding in housing. Los Angeles Times, November 26, 1986, II, p 1, 5.Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Fuentes A, Miller M: Unreasonable access: Sexual harassment comes home. City Limits 11:16–22, 1986.Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Bassuk EL, Ryback RF: Homeless battered women and their shelter network in Bassuk, EL (ed): The Mental Health Needs of Homeless Persons. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass, 1986.Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    Dobie K: No safe place: Battered women in homelessness. City Limits 11:16–21, 1986.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    Coalition for the Homeless: Perchance to Sleep: Homeless Children without Shelter in New York City, 1984. New York, The Coalition for the Homeless, 1984.Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Schussheim M: The Reagan 1987 budget and the homeless. Congressional Research Review 7:2–23, 1986.Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    Wood E: Public Housing and Mrs. McGee. New York Citizens’ Housing and Planning Council, reprint of a presentation to the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials, October 24, 1956, New York City.Google Scholar
  49. 49.
    Struyk R, Soldo BJ: Improving the Elderly’s Housing: A Key to Preserving the Nations’ Housing Stock and Neighborhoods. Cambridge, Ballinger, 1980.Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    Hayden D: What would a non-sexist city be like?, in Bratt R, Hartman C, Meyerson A (eds): Critical Perspectives on Housing. Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1986.Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    Wekerle GR: From refuge to service center: Neighborhoods that support women. Sociological Focus 18:79–95, April 1985.Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    US Bureau of the Census. Money income of households, families, and persons in the United States: 1984. Current Population Reports. Washington, DC, US Government Printing Office, 1986.Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    US Bureau of the Census. Money income of households, families, and persons in the United States: 1983. Current Population Reports. Washington, DC, US Government Printing Office, 1986.Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    US Bureau of the Census: 1983 Annual Housing Survey, Part C. Washington, DC, US Government Printing Office, 1984.Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    US Bureau of the Census: 1978–1983 Annual Housing Survey. Washington, DC, US Government Printing Office, 1979-1984.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacqueline Leavitt
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Architecture and Urban PlanningUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

Personalised recommendations