Homelessness pp 165-174 | Cite as

Strategies for the Delivery of Medical Care

Focus on Tuberculosis and Hypertension
  • Philip W. Brickner
  • John McAdam
  • William J. Vicic
  • Patricia Doherty
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

Medical disorders of homeless persons include the diverse conditions to which all human beings are subject in the urban United States. Esoteric diseases are noted infrequently, but those common clinical disorders that are exacerbated by crowding in shelters and by exposure to extremes of heat and cold, to dampness, or to the stresses of life on the streets are unusually prevalent. Examples include trauma, the broad range of infectious respiratory states, infestations with scabies and lice, and peripheral vascular disease.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Tuberculin Skin Test Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Active Tuberculosis Purify Protein Derivative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip W. Brickner
    • 1
  • John McAdam
    • 1
  • William J. Vicic
    • 1
  • Patricia Doherty
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Community MedicineSt. Vincent’s Hospital and Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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