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Model Types

  • John P. van Gigch

Abstract

This chapter is devoted to giving a sample of typical models used in organizational research. It is obvious that we can provide only a few illustrations of the models available. No doubt, readers will add examples of models from their own experience. Apart from the classic models discussed in the literature, every problem lends itself to the design of a new model or to the modification of an old one.

Keywords

Membership Function Expert System Diagnostic Problem Symbolic Model Tradeoff Decision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John P. van Gigch
    • 1
  1. 1.California State UniversitySacramentoUSA

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