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The System Approach: Applied System Theory

  • John P. van Gigch

Abstract

The system approach can rightfully be called applied system theory (applied ST). Therefore it is important to provide the reader with a basic understanding of the emerging science of systems.

Keywords

System Approach Living System Physical Science Decision Unit Science Paradigm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John P. van Gigch
    • 1
  1. 1.California State UniversitySacramentoUSA

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