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The Morality of System Design

  • John P. van Gigch

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss the ethical implications of system design. In the past, science and design could remain value free. One of the important premises of the Industrial Revolution was that the optimum course of action is dictated solely by the “technological imperative,” according to which efficiency means finding the solution with the lowest technical costs.1

Keywords

Business Ethic Social Responsibility Brain Death Moral Ideal Moral Rule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John P. van Gigch
    • 1
  1. 1.California State UniversitySacramentoUSA

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