Nondestructive Characterization of Solids Levels in High Viscosity Emulsions

  • F. Villamagna
  • M. C. Lee
  • J.-D. Aussel
  • C. K. Jen

Abstract

Emulsion explosives are extensively used in the construction and mining business. The physical consistency of emulsions can range from a stiff, putty-like substance to a fluid, pumpable product, depending on the choice of fuels and process [1]. Emulsions which are the most recent generation of commercial explosives, are a safe, cost-effective and high performance alternative to conventional nitroglycerine and slurry explosives. Their high velocity of detonation and exceptional water resistance offer superior rock breaking properties and wider usage on surface or underground.

Keywords

Ultrasonic Velocity Ultrasonic Pulse Ultrasonic Transducer Ultrasonic Signal Ultrasonic Attenuation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Villamagna
    • 1
  • M. C. Lee
    • 1
  • J.-D. Aussel
    • 2
  • C. K. Jen
    • 2
  1. 1.ICI Explosives Group Technical CenterMcMastervilleCanada
  2. 2.IMRINational Research Council of CanadaBouchervilleCanada

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