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Phase Volume Measurements Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  • Michael J. McCarthy
  • Sanguansri Charoenrein
  • J. Bruce German
  • Kathryn L. McCarthy
  • David S. Reid
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 302)

Abstract

The phase distribution of components in both model and actual food systems has been quantified using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. We present measurements of effective moisture diffusivities, vertical mass distributions in foams, and crystallization of water and lipid components. The interpretation of this information allows one to quantify the interactions of various components and structural features within a sample. These measurements are made noninvasively and nondestructively and can be repeated over time to obtain information on the dynamics of the system.

Keywords

Multiphase System Bubble Collapse Foam Density Effective Moisture Diffusivity Foam Drainage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. McCarthy
    • 1
  • Sanguansri Charoenrein
    • 1
  • J. Bruce German
    • 1
  • Kathryn L. McCarthy
    • 1
  • David S. Reid
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food Science and TechnologyUniversity of California, DavisDavisUSA

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